Fade Reception Date

Yay!

Director Lynne Todaro and I settled on a date for my Fade reception at Vargas Gallery, Wednesday, December 6 from 4-7 pm. Perfect timing for students, between classes and between holidays. I’m delighted to hear that the show, which began Nov 8, has been getting a great response and I am looking forward to entertaining visitors at the reception! I hope you can join me if you are in the area!!!

These are some of the “artist with her work” shots taken at the exhibit to come up with a show promotion…

Such a lovely space! Vargas Gallery is located in the Gillmor Center in the middle of the Mission College Campus. Gallery hours are Monday  & Wednesday 11 am – 2 pm and Thursday 3:30 -6:30 pm.

 

Installing Fade my Solo Show at Vargas Gallery

I was so delighted to throw together a last minute solo show for Vargas Gallery at Mission College! I’m calling it Fade – it’s a collection of my Fade to White work, exploring albinism and leucism in our flora and fauna, laced with larger pieces I’ve done over the years that touch on themes of vulnerability and tenacity, beauty and mystery.

The show will run November 9 – December 14 (Reception TBA) Thanks to Director Lynne Todaro for the opportunity and to Ashley at the gallery for her help setting up!

How much is that Doggie in the Window?

“If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where the dogs went.” – Will Rogers.

A pack of pooches were juried into the display in the front window of Gallery 24 for the month of November. Paintings are by Julia Watson, Kay Duffy, myself, Sandi Okita and Kevin Kasik.

Here’s a close up of my painting, Retriever in the Orchard, a 12″ x 12” oil on panel. I met this beautiful chocolate lab bounding through the historic apricot orchard in Saratoga  between rain showers and piano lessons one spring.

Waterlines Preview Party

Waterlines opened up last night at NUMU with a fabulous, packed preview party for members!  I am so honored to be part of this extremely beautiful show curated by Marianne McGrath with such outstanding artists working in a multiplicity of media and bringing distinct perspectives and sensitive visions and voices speaking to our experience of water. Exhibiting artists include: Judith Belzer, Barbara Boissevain, Marie Cameron, Matthew Chase-Daniel, Christel Dillbohner, Linda Gass, Nancy Genn, Liz Hickok, Theodora Varnay Jones, Pantea Karimi, Cheryl E. Leonard, Danae Mattes, Marsha McDonald, Klea McKenna, Ryan M. Reynolds and Linda Simmel, I have added links to all of their websites which can be accessed by clicking on their names below.

Always a pertinent topic, and especially so in California, NUMU was able to enjoy the support of sponsors such as Badger Meter and San Jose Water Company and Kumiko Iwasawa, Iwasawa Oriental for Waterlines.

Executive Director Lisa Coscino and Curator Marianne McGrath, talking about the genesis of the show and introducing sound artist Cheryl E. Leonard who played transporting music with objects from the sea and layers of recorded sounds from waves and melting glaciers.

Here are some of her instruments, mussel shells, stones, dried kelp flute, stinger driftwood and shell rattles  and sand.

Music by Cheryl E. Leonard,  Video by Oona Stern.

I love how the various pieces in Waterlines seem to be in conversation with one another.

With my assemblage painting with found objects and Pacific Ocean water, Stilla Maris which is Latin for Drop of the Sea and is thought to be the precursor to Stella Maris.

With California Water Rites, my assemblage with Los Gatos tap water.

California Water Rites and Poem

Theodora Varnay Jones – Poem

Christel Dillbohner with Frozen in Time – oil, cold wax on linen and Motionless Torrents – oil on silver leaf.

With Danae Mattes and her Evaporation Pool.

Site Specific Evaporation Pool by Danae Mattes.

Exhibiting artists Danae Mattes and Liz Hickok with Holly Van Hart.

Liz Hickok‘s photographs (sublimation print on aluminum) Lithosphere and Signal to Noise.

Pantea Karimi speaking about her silkscreen, Mapping a Gulf: The Persian Gulf Map and Tour of The Persian Gulf Album with Lorraine Lawson.

Judith Belzer‘s paintings.

Linda Gass with her sumptuous painted silk textile pieces, Owens River Diversion and San Joaquin Merced Revival.

Marsha McDonald – Slough, one of many GIF videos of water.

Barbara A. Boissevain aerial photographs of Bay Area salt ponds.

Barbara A. Boisssevain – Salt Pond Restoration Photo Grid

Matthew Chase-Daniel – Swamp South of Crescent City – photo assemblage.

Nancy Genn‘s Patagonia series casein paintings on canvas.

Linda Simmel photopolymer intaglio etchings, 75kts and 60kts.

Linda Simmel – Book of Seas - gesso/pencil on gampi paper, steel binding.

Ryan Reynolds – Frogshead and Petaluma River – oil on panel.

Klea McKenna Rainstorms & Rain Studies

Klea McKenna

Waterlines runs from October 6 – March 18.  November 4th several Waterline artists will be present to talk about their work (including me) in conjunction with NUMU’s Winter Celebration. I hope you get a chance to see the exhibit in person because my photographs are not capturing the beauty of the work!

On Exhibit with Waterlines

I am so very honored to asked to participate in Waterlines, a gorgeous and relevant exhibition at NUMU curated by Marianne McGrath which includes some amazing work from 16 artists, bay area and beyond each coming to water with a different viewpoint and voice!  The show runs from October 6  - March 18 with a member’s Preview Party tonight and an artist walk through November 4, as part of NUMU’s Winter Celebration.

The two pieces I have in the show, Stilla Maris (Drop of the Sea) and California Water Rites both focus on the notion that all water is holy and we need revaluate our cavalier relationship to it.

Stilla Maris – assemblage painting with found objects and Pacific Ocean water – 2016

 

California Water Rites – Assemblage with tap water – 2016

Sanchez 50|50 Opening Tonight!

Woohoo – the 9th annual Sanchez Art Center’s 50I50 show is tonight! It’s so exciting to see all this work of 50 paintings in 50 days culminate in this one fantastic night where 60 Bay Area artists, all juried in by gallerist, Jack Fischer, display 3200 pieces of 6″ x 6″ art which get plucked off the wall and taken to new homes!  The preview (from 6-8 pm) is completely sold out and the free public reception (from 8-9:30 pm) is sure to be packed!

 

Here are some snaps from last weekend when I installed Fade to White at the Sanchez Art Center, located at 1220-B Linda Mar Blvd in Pacifica, California. It was the very beginning of a three day install, and the work I did get to see was so good and the rest I’ve been avidly following online…I hope I get a chance to shop too!

 

We were encouraged to offer pre-sales and I’m delighted to share that a full 20% of my Fade to White series, of oil and encaustic paintings exploring albinism and leucism in our Flora and Fauna has been pre-sold!

 

If you’d like to find me tonight, my work is in the West Wing, at the end of the hall with the piano, I hope the pianist takes requests! And if you’re not able to make it tonight, the Sanchez Art Center will be open Friday, Saturday and Sundays through to October 1st with any remaining work.

Fade to White – Artist Statement

I’ve been fooling around with some square business cards for Sanchez 50 I 50, you know the kind with a new image on each one…this will be the back with my contact info and painting care instructions.

I often live in my head about what I’m doing, and it was pointed out that by an artist friend (thank you Andy Ballantyne) that I should share the meaning behind my Fade to White series since they are more than purely decorative.

Here’s the Artist Statement I’ve prepared for the show:

It’s so magical to see a ghostly white apparition in the forrest!
I was overwhelmed the first time I saw an albino deer years ago at Pine Mountain Lake in Groveland and thrilled to witness a leucistic hummingbird at the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum a year ago! I am intrigued by the increasingly frequent reports of albinism and leucism in our native flora and fauna.

Very rare in the wild, these white creatures stand out from their surroundings making it hard for them to be a predator and harder still to be prey. These genetic conditions carry other risks as well, including sensitivity to sunlight with a higher risk of skin cancer and weakened feathers in birds. Finding mates can also be more challenging. Plants without the chlorophyl fail to thrive and need to be associated with a green parent plant to grow. Interestingly, the case of albino redwoods, there is evidence that the albino shoots are actually processing toxins in the soil.

With the expansion of human development, real wild spaces are shrinking and becoming disconnected, creating isolated gene pools which heighten the opportunities for recessive albinism and leucism to express where it might not in a more diverse gene pool. Animals like deer, squirrels and raccoons that can live close to humans benefit from increased predator protection and entire communities of leucistic and albino populations are popping up. Of course there are more people and cameras on the look out for these unique and beautiful creatures.

In this series I have laid an encaustic veil over the oil painitng of flora and fauna, at times inscribing lines of pigment, colors which has been lost. I see this veil as one that we are unintentionally drawing over our wildlife.