Seeing Red

Teacup Head - Marie Cameron 2015Still fooling around with teacups!

This time I have a group of red transferware pieces with birds already adorning them, a red bird floral by Coalport, a swan with rushes, also by Coalport, and a tiny a child’s cup with a bird on the inside is (also from England). Transferware first came onto the scene by the mid 18th century as a quick (and more affordable) alternative to hand painted decoration. Blues and browns were more common but the red may have laid the frame work for the redwork embroidery that was to become so popular in the 19th century due to the introduction of floss from Turkey which was dyed with madder (roots from the rubia plant) that wouldn’t run like other dyes.┬áDesigns were embroidered onto muslin using a simple outline stitch that even children could do, decorating linens and quilt squares reaching a height in popularity early in the 20th century.

Pairing these two up was a no brainer – the bigger challenge will be to determine what kind of bird is portrayed here? The only red bird I know of is a cardinal.

Red Birds 3 - Marie Cameron 2015

 

Red Birds 6 - Marie Cameron 2015

Red Birds 7 - Marie Cameron 2015

Red Birds - 1 - Marie Cameron 2015

Red Birds 4 - Marie Cameron 2015

Red Birds 5 - Marie Cameron 2015

Red Birds 8 - Marie Cameron 2015

Lilac Tea Photo - Marie Cameron 2015

Ranunculus Tea Photo - Marie Cameron