Rose Garden Blooming in the Studio

I have a little rose garden blooming in my studio, all Edens. I’m glad I managed to take a little snap as several have sold already! Also seen here is one of the many fabulous demitasses that my friend (and children’s former pre-school teacher) had given me as well as the painting it inspired by it (that I will be giving to her as a thank you gift for the treasure trove). The canary, from Montebello Road in Campbell, is a future model for one of my Birds and Teacup paintings. More details about the paintings are listed in my Portfolio under the Flora subheading.

Eden Rose I – Sold

Eden Rose II – Sold

Eden Rose III – Available

Eden Rose IV – Available

Eden Rose V – Available

Eden Rose VI – Available

Lilac Tea Time

I just put up Lilac Tea I on my portfolio and soon it will be exhibited in womanKIND, A Cole / Drews Project supporting the YWCA of Silicon Valley at The Citadel Gallery from December 16-19 with a reception Saturday, December 17 from 6-9.

The lilac symbolizes the first emotions of love in the Victorian language of flowers, I paired this flower with an Anna’s Hummingbird and an antique Bavarian J &C teacup called “Louise” (my middle name).

Anemone Tea I Alighting at Gallery 24

In Anemone Tea I, which I’ve just listed on the website and will be taking into Gallery 24 this morning, I’ve paired one of the Steller’s Jays that hangs out around my studio with an antique blue flow Chen-Si teacup and anemones which signify forsaken love in the Victorian language of flowers.

Magnolia Tea II Alighting at Gallery 24

I just listed Magnolia Tea II on the website and will be bringing it into Gallery 25 with a flock of other Birds and Teacups. In this painting, I tried to bring home some of the magic of spotting a white hummingbird in the wild to capture it in a domestic still life with this unusual, unpainted Limoges demitasse set and Magnolia Grandiflora bloom which represents nobility and perseverance in the Victorian language of flowers.

Your Presence Soothes Me

I love how these paintings come together, often the teacup is the inspirational launching point, but this time I had spotted a Townsend’s Warbler in my neighbor’s camellias and while photographing it (such a shy bird) I began to imagine what flower might suit its sweet masked face… and knew right away that it had to be the black and yellow striped petunia which I picked up in one of my local nurseries, and finding a matching teacup turned to be a cinch on ebay – a Royal Standard bone china classic from England! When I discovered the Victorian meaning of the petunia was “your presence soothes me”, I thought of the mourning jewelry I’ve been quietly obsessed with as of late and included a braided hair locket in my vignette. Of course, it wasn’t complete until I had a backdrop worked out and my yellow cotton dress with black and white feather embroidery seemed perfect. I’ve framed the painting in a sculptural, undulating black frame with a rich patina. I liked this combination so much, I went on to paint a matching Petunia Tea II with a gold locket.

Both of these paintings were just listed on my website and I will be taking them into Gallery 24 in Los Gatos, California this Friday along with a flock which includes a Steller’s Jay, a White Anna’s Hummingbird and a House Finch, which I’ll be posting, post haste!

teamLab at Pace

While I was picking up work from the Pacific Art League’s Figures and Faces show, which just wrapped up, I remembered that Pace was only minutes away and I was curious if the Pace Art + Technology exhibit with teamLab was still on. As luck would have it the show runs until July and I made it under the wire of their Memorial Day Weekend hours restrictions. What a show of digital and light based work!

This one seemed like a cosmic, electronic, floating sugar cube with it’s sparkling, ever-changing light display.

There were two of these floral digital displays which would grow and evolve and shed their petals. These ladies were not touching the screen but checking to see it their proximity would alter the events on the screen – it’s hard to tell whether this is so of is coincidental. It was beautifully ethereal!

In this room full of digital displays scored to music we were all mesmerized by the unfolding imagery.

In this installation of hanging lights, lined with mirror at the periphery, color shimmered and pulsated and we were offered glimpsed of ourselves and others though the glowing, twinkling curtain. It felt like an Indian wedding place to me and I had a craving for kulfi.

 

 

 

This digital piece was like a perpetual wave tank designed by Hokusai.

 

This was such an engaging piece, comprised of a number of digital panels it told the story of a man who chopped down a tree an released something terrible. The traditional imagery from the fable kept morphing and dissolving before out eyes. Utterly fascinating!

This piece showed the evolution of life from a branching armature into a blossoming ecosystem as it spun knit’s virtual digital axis. Gorgeous!

In the adjacent pavilion the younger set were trying their hand (and feet) at the interactive fun.

I think in the midst of that dark, disorienting maze I missed a few exhibits – I can’t wait to go back with my family!

To visit teamlab on Artsy clime here for the link: www.artsy.net/artist/teamlab