teamLab at Pace

While I was picking up work from the Pacific Art League’s Figures and Faces show, which just wrapped up, I remembered that Pace was only minutes away and I was curious if the Pace Art + Technology exhibit with teamLab was still on. As luck would have it the show runs until July and I made it under the wire of their Memorial Day Weekend hours restrictions. What a show of digital and light based work!

This one seemed like a cosmic, electronic, floating sugar cube with it’s sparkling, ever-changing light display.

There were two of these floral digital displays which would grow and evolve and shed their petals. These ladies were not touching the screen but checking to see it their proximity would alter the events on the screen – it’s hard to tell whether this is so of is coincidental. It was beautifully ethereal!

In this room full of digital displays scored to music we were all mesmerized by the unfolding imagery.

In this installation of hanging lights, lined with mirror at the periphery, color shimmered and pulsated and we were offered glimpsed of ourselves and others though the glowing, twinkling curtain. It felt like an Indian wedding place to me and I had a craving for kulfi.

 

 

 

This digital piece was like a perpetual wave tank designed by Hokusai.

 

This was such an engaging piece, comprised of a number of digital panels it told the story of a man who chopped down a tree an released something terrible. The traditional imagery from the fable kept morphing and dissolving before out eyes. Utterly fascinating!

This piece showed the evolution of life from a branching armature into a blossoming ecosystem as it spun knit’s virtual digital axis. Gorgeous!

In the adjacent pavilion the younger set were trying their hand (and feet) at the interactive fun.

I think in the midst of that dark, disorienting maze I missed a few exhibits – I can’t wait to go back with my family!

To visit teamlab on Artsy clime here for the link: www.artsy.net/artist/teamlab

Tulip Demitasse

Found these fabulous variegated tulips at Bunches the other day and while they’re not the exact striped tulip that is depicted on this Italian demitasse, they do make a lovely compliment. I took a number of shots to make sure I had the right composition when my bird comes along. The variegated tulip signifies “beautiful eyes” in the Victorian language of flowers, I wonder it this will helps me decide on a bird?

Tulip Demitasse I - Marie Cameron 2016

Tulip Demitasse 3 - Marie Cameron 2016

Tulip Demitasse 4- Marie Cameron 2016

Tulip Demitasse 5 - Marie Cameron 2016

Tulip Demitasse 6 - Marie Cameron 2016

Tulip Demitasse7 - Marie Cameron 2016

Tulip Demitasse 8 - Marie Cameron 2016

Tulip Demitasse 9 - Marie Cameron 2016

 

Painting of Violet Tea I

Another in my Birds & Teacups Series, Violet Tea I is still very much a work in progress…

Violet Tea I (WIP 1) Marie Cameron 2016

Quick oil sketch…

Violet Tea I (WIP 2) Marie Cameron 2016

Some lovely loose brush strokes suggesting violets…

Violet Tea I (WIP 3) Marie Cameron 2016

Sketching in the background…

Violet Tea I (WIP 4) Marie Cameron 2016

Filling in here and there…

Violet Tea I (WIP 5) Marie Cameron 2016

Wiping off the gestural background that I was afraid was building up too much…

Violet Tea I (WIP 6) Marie Cameron 2016

Blocking in some shadows and loosing my loose violets in a pursuit of realism…

Violet Tea I (WIP 7) Marie Cameron 2016

Sharpening up details, but there’s such a long way to go in terms of drama (which will come from the lighting) in this piece…..I’ll post more when there’s more to see.

Violet Tea I (WIP) 8 Marie Cameron 2016
I didn’t know I was going to go for a greenish background! Such a busy image really called out for a simplified palette.

Violet Tea I - oil on board - 12x12 inches - Marie Cameron 2016

Here is the finished painting, which is now on exhibit at the Los Gatos Museum Gallery.

 

Magnolia Tea I (WIP)

A new Bird & Teacup on the easel today! This time it’s one of the little Dark-eyed Junkos that are always underfoot. This one is nestled into some branches of Star Magnolia that my friend painter Isaias Sandoval had cut for me from his tree. I love the way it’s coming together!

Magnolia Tea I  (WIP) 1 - Marie Cameron 2016

I sketched out the image in magenta oil…

Magnolia Tea I (WIP) 2 - Marie Cameron 2016

Blocked in the darks and mid tones of the background loosely…

Magnolia Tea I  (WIP) 3 - Marie Cameron 2016

Worked in the branches…

Magnolia Tea I  (WIP) 4 - Marie Cameron 2016

Paid some attention to my bird…

Magnolia Tea I  (WIP) 5 - Marie Cameron 2016

Laying in the shadows in the petals and cup, they may look like white flowers but they have a huge range of warm and cool colors (pinks. yellows, greens, treys, lavenders and blues) in both the shadows…

Magnolia Tea I  (WIP) 6 - Marie Cameron 2016

And the highlights…

More tomorrow!

Crown of Chrysanthemums

The chrysanthemum season has come to a close. I decided to forgo the last of the season bouquet in favor of whipping up a chrysanthemum wreath in the last bits of sun before the oncoming rain. The mums are a long lived cut flower but their life fashioned into a crown brief but glorious!

 

 

Crowned – Queen Mum!

In the Camelias

The thirty year old camellia tree in my neighbor’s front yard may be the only thing blooming this time of year. It’s quite a show stopper and is attracting a lot of birds – even in the rain!

I had to go over with my camera and see if I could get lucky – I did get a few shots of some birds but what I found myself enjoying even more was the damp fragrance of the flowers and the sound of wings (bees and hummers) buzzing in my ears.

 

Mr. Katayama’s Peonies

I received a lovely gift from a friend. Her father was a well loved gardener and upon his passing she found homes for many of the beautiful plants he had tenderly cared for. Not only do I have several of his beauty berry bushes and white tree peonies, but this glorious purple tree peony. I send my friend a photo of it blooming every year. What I really want is to do a painting for her.  To that end I’ve been shooting it to see what I come up with as reference material – some of them stand up quite well as purely photographs.  I’ve put them together here to see which ones she would prefer to have translated into a painting.

Mr Katayama's Peony 3 - Marie Cameron - 2014

 

Mr Katayama's Peony 1 - Marie Cameron - 2014

 

Mr Katayama's Peony 2 - Marie Cameron - 2014

 

Mr Katayama's Peony 4 - Marie Cameron - 2014

 

Mr Katayama's Peony 10 - Marie Cameron - 2014

 

Above are very traditional ways of handling florals. A bloom in a vase allows you to isolate the form more clearly and the vase can provide a secondary subject matter as well as a base for the flower. I could envision loosing the vase entirely in the image directly above and continuing on with the grey patterned background in a drippy, painterly way.

The images below do obscure the vase and are shot from angles less typically used for paintings but are well suited for photography. These shots are more about light and lines and form and less a “portrait” of the flower and opens the door to elements of abstraction and it is fine that these flowers seem to be floating in space.

Mr Katayama's Peony 9 - Marie Cameron - 2014

 

Mr Katayama's Peony 5 - Marie Cameron - 2014

 

Mr Katayama's Peony 7 - Marie Cameron - 2014

 

Mr Katayama's Peony 6 - Marie Cameron - 2014

 

Both groups would work well for a painting, I think it’s a matter of traditional or contemporary taste. What do you think?