Honoring the Legacy of David Park – Reception – SCU

Honoring the Legacy of David Park
Edward M Dowd Art and Art History Building
Santa Clara Univiersity
April 3 − 28 2017

WOW!

The Panel Discussion and Reception for the Honoring the Legacy of David Park exhibition curated by John Seed and organized by Kelly Detweiler was truly memorable! There was a fascinating Panel Discussion with Jennifer Pochinski, Helen Park Bigelow, John Seed , DeWitt Cheng and Kelly Detweiler.

The show was juried by John Seed, DeWitt Cheng, Jessica Phillips and Andrea Pappas. Congratulations to the winners Gage OpdenbrouwKurt SolmssenMark HansonBetsy Kendall and Phyllis Hersh Gorsen!

Invited Artists:
Kyle Staver
Jennifer Pochinski

Juried Artists:
Alix Bailey, James Bland, Marie Cameron, Linda Christensen, Ashley Norwood Cooper, Melinda Cootsona, Kim Frohsin, Sonia Gill, Phyllis Gorsen, Cynthia Grili, Nancy Gruskin, Mark Hanson, Irene Cuadrado Hernandez, Mitchel Johnson, Betsy Kendall, Rachel Kline,Sue Ellen R. Leys, Kathy Liao, Fred Lower, Janet Norris, Gage Opdenbrouw, David Iacovazzi-Pau, Jill Madden, Nicholas Mancini, Sandy Ostrau, Catherine Prescott, Jose Luis Ceña Ruiz, William Rushton, Francis Sills, Kurt Solmssen, David Tomb, Christina Renfer Vogel, Martin Webb, John Webber, William Wray

There is a beautiful exhibition catalogue available online:
http://www.magcloud.com/browse/issue/1249787

David Park
Woman with Red Mouth
(reproduction – original oil on canvas

Curator John Seed with Kyle Staver’s Biker Trilogy.

Curator John Seed with Dead Dog from Kyle Staver’s Biker Trilogy.

Curator John Seed with Jennifer Pochinski’s Strand and Two Women.

Jennifer Pochinski with her oil paintings Strand and Two Women.

Mitchell Johnson with his oil painting Met Breuer 1.

Kim Frohsin with her acrylic, pencil and ink painting, Nightime at the Fair.

Gage Opdenbrouw with his oil painting Garden (Garland of Hours).

 

 

 

Mark Hanson with his oil, Late Afternoon.

Me with my oil pairing Blue Corset.

Sue Ellen R. Leys with her encaustic Asbury Surf.

Martin Webb with his mixed media painting Boatbuilding.

Kathy Liao and her oil painting Float.

David Tomb with his charcoal drawing, Quiet Conversations (and artist Kim Frohsin).

Linda Christensen and her oil painting Lifeguard.

William Rushton with his oil painting Afternoon Light.

Sonia Gill with her oil painting The Assistant.

David Iacovazzi-Pau with his oil painting Tom & Billy (portrait of Tom Schneph and Billy Hertz).

Sandy Ostrau with her oil painting Whale Watch.

Cynthia Grilli with her oil painting The Envelope.

Sonia Gill with her oil painting The Assistant.

Honoring the Legacy of David Park Panel Discussion. Jennifer Pochinski, Helen Park Bigelow (Davis Park’s daughter and author of  David Park, Painter: Nothing Held Back, John SeedDeWitt Cheng and Kelly Detweiler.

Linda Fleming’s newly installed painted steel sculpture.
Edward M. Dowd Art & Art History B

Linda Fleming’s newly installed painted steel sculpture.
Edward M. Dowd Art & Art History Building
Santa Clara University

Abstracts From Life at NUMU

So nice to meet many of the exhibiting artists in Abstracts From Life: Bay Area Figurative Past and Present at the Members Reception held at NUMU last night in Los Gatos, California. It’s a beautiful exhibit curated by Marianne McGrath with exceptional work by Michael Azgour, Joan Brown, Suhas Bhujbal, Linda Christensen, Richard Diebenkorn, Dennis Hare, Mitchell Johnson, Brigitte McReynolds, Nathan Oliveira, Joan Savo, Jennifer Pochinski, William Rushton, Terry St. John and James Weeks. The show continues on until September 10, 2017. The following are a few photos from the evening and a small sampling of the work which glowed dramatically off of the dark walls (so hard to shoot)! All the more reason to come in and see it for yourself! For additional information on the artists, click on their names for links to websites and bios.

Suhas Bhujbal - Flower Market – oil on canvas

Mitchell Johnson

Brigitte McReynolds

Jennifer Pochinski - The Wonderful Race, –  Penelope, Livingroom

(detail from The Wonderful Race)

Linda Christensen - Tableau – oil on canvas

Linda Christensen -The Writer – oil on canvas

William Rushton - Street Play – oil on canvas

(detail)

Michael Azgour - Canal Street – oil on canvas

Joan Savo - Untitled (figure)  - oil on canvas

Richard Diebenkorn  – Untitled – charcoal on paper

Richard Diebenkorn - Untitled – charcoal on paper

Nathan Oliveira - Untitled Figure.  Crown Point Press Nude 14 – watercolor on paper

James Weeks – Promenade Under the Trees – oil on canvas

 

Last Chance – More Than Your Selfie

This weekend is the last chance to see More Than Your Selfie at New Museum Los Gatos. It’s been an outstanding exhibition of self-portraits by artists that go beyond the surface of the selfie in a an exploration of what portraiture can convey. We’re extremely fortunate to have works from these artists with us in Los Gatos! There were some fabulous artist talks held in conjunction with this show, a few of which I’ve covered in earlier posts.

Alex Kanevsky – Artist Looking for a Painting

Hung Liu – Official Portraits – Citizen – color lithograph with collage

Self Portrait (In Absentia) oil on linen

Judy Dater – Ms. Clingfree – ektacolor print

Ray Turner – Self-Portrait – oil on glass

Cristina Nuñez – Someone to Love – 2011 – video installation

Julie Heffernan – Self Portrait with Falling Sky – 2011 – oil on canvas

Linda Christiansen – Self Portrait – oil on canvas

Danny Sceible, Robert Arneson, Travis Collinson

Nina Kathcadourian and Philip Hua

Erin Feller and Kim Frohsin

Robert Mapplethorpe – Self Portrait – platinum print

 

Linda Christensen at NUMU

In conjunction with the ongoing More Than Your Selfie exhibit, Linda Christensen gave a great talk at NUMU last night in which she talked about her painting philosophy, process and studio tips!

In Self, Linda Christensen’s oil painting in the More that your Selfie exhibit at NUMU, as in most of her work, the artist  is interested in the “honest body language of the unobserved figure”. Her paintings are not about capturing a likeness but rather a gesture, a pose and in inner life. Her paintings are large and loose and bold and laced the line and pattern.

The paintings go through radical transformations as she works, which she demonstrated to us in a series of photographs. She may lay in the loose outline of a figure in a scene then go back into it with stencils and palette knives and brushes, breaking up the figure and space in surprising ways which direct the painting until there is an emotional resonance that starts to happen.

I loved how she spoke about her studio experience, how every aspect of it should be conducive to her process, right down to the sensory experience of tracing paper. She likes an abundance of canvases, stacked up, lots of paint perpetually open, brushes hanging out in the turps, a six foot long glass palette and lots of room to move in. Her process is to paint, turn and cleanse her “visual palette” with a classic black and white movie that she has running, look out the window to stretch her eyes than walk right back to the canvas with fresh eyes, knowing what she needs to do next. She’s set herself up for success, limiting the reasons to leave the studio, to break her focus.  She said something that was very interesting, “If it’s hard, I’m not going to do it”. So know and honor your process, make it as enjoyable as you can.

She spoke of how painting is so highly personal and that your Point of View is really something to be cherished. It’s important to hone in on what really interests you and to realize that what you’re drawn to and how you work is part of that Point of VIew.

Linda Christensen shared with us a thumbnail timeline she had prepared for a college talk in which she had laid out  her work and influences over the years chronologically and recommend it as a great way to glean insights and perspective into the arc of one’s work.

Another tip she had was trying Color-aid cards, complete with mixing instructions on the back. She said it was sometimes fun to pull out a new palette to work with.

The audience was largely comprised of artists and we couldn’t get enough!